ICE Lift V8 – a dropper seatpost for the masses?

Dropper seatposts are one of those inventions you either get or you don’t. Some riders love being able to drop their saddle out of the way when things get gnarly. Others see it as a badge of honour that they can clear sketchy sections with their seat at full height, despite the imminent danger to their undercarriage. Whichever side you sit on, one thing’s for sure – decent droppers don’t come cheap. Or do they?

The ICE Lift V8 costs just €117 / £120 (no US distributor yet) – less than half the price of rivals like the RockShox Reverb, KS Lev and upcoming Thomson Elite Dropper, and £50 cheaper than Giant’s Contact Switch. We haven’t had a chance to put it through its paces yet but it certainly looks the business, with its red detailing, low cable exit point and remote lever. Ultra-simple internals should hopefully mean good reliability too.

It’s got 90mm of travel and comes in a 27.2mm diameter – something that should keep hardtail fans happy – with shims to fit bigger seat tubes. Weight is similar to its rivals – 555g. It’s only the rubber boot that betrays its budget pricepoint, and that’s something Gravity Dropper use to keep the crud at bay on their much pricier posts. Check out the photos to find out more. More info at www.ice-helmet.com / www.r53sport.com (UK).

No fancy hydraulic internals here – under the rubber boot is a simple mechanical spring. Picture by James Costley-White

No fancy hydraulic internals here – under the rubber boot is a simple mechanical spring

The remote lever activates a pin which locks the post in one of three positions – fully up, halfway up or fully down. Picture by James Costley-White

The remote lever activates a pin which locks the post in one of three positions – fully up, halfway up or fully down

The lever itself is pretty basic but shouldn't take up too much space on your bar. Picture by James Costley-White

The lever itself is pretty basic but shouldn’t take up too much space on your bar

At the top end of the post is a standard twin-bolt inline clamp. Picture by James Costley-White

At the top end of the post is a standard twin-bolt inline clamp